Monday Open Question: What do neuroscientists know that the average person doesn’t?

Science helps us explain the world, often in ways that we wouldn’t necessarily be able to from every day experience. What is it that we know about ourselves and our nervous system that most people don’t realize?

Specifically, what aspect of behavior do neuroscientists take for granted that the average person doesn’t know?

My example: All perception is inference (not necessarily Bayesian).

I was reading a piece of philosophy by Bertrand Russell from ~100 years ago where he distinguished between sensory facts which were inferred and sensory facts that were directly sensed. I would propose that it is now noncontroversial (???) that all perception is some form of inference.

What else?

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One thought on “Monday Open Question: What do neuroscientists know that the average person doesn’t?

  1. Funny, because the idea of perception-as-inference dates back to Helmholtz, before Russell. And the idea always seemed more like a conceptual framework than an actual scientific result – can you really *prove* that perception is inference, or is it just a working definition of what “perception” is for the psychologist/neuroscientist?

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