#Cosyne2015, by the numbers

 

Cosyne2015_posters

Another year, another Cosyne. Sadly, I will be there only in spirit (and not, you know, reality.) But I did manage to get my hands all over the Cosyne abstract authors data…I can now tell you everyone who has had a poster or talk presented there and who it was with. Did you know Steven Pinker was a coauthor on a paper in 2004?!

This year, the winner of the ‘most posters’ award (aka, the Hierarch of Cosyne)  goes to Carlos Brody. Carlos has been developing high-throughput technology to really bang away at the hard problem of decision-making in rodents, and now all that work is coming out at once. Full disclosure notice, his lab sits above me and they are all doing really awesome work.

Here are the Hierarchs, historically:

  • 2004: L. Abbott/M. Meister
  • 2005: A. Zador
  • 2006: P. Dayan
  • 2007: L. Paninski
  • 2008: L. Paninski
  • 2009: J. Victor
  • 2010: A. Zador
  • 2011: L. Paninski
  • 2012: E. Simoncelli
  • 2013: J. Pillow/L. Abbott/L. Paninski
  • 2014: W. Gerstner
  • 2015: C. Brody

CosyneAll_posters

Above is the total number of posters/abstracts by author. There are prolific authors, and there is Liam Paninski. Congratulations Liam, you maintain your iron grip as the Pope of Cosyne.

As a technical note, I took ‘unique’ names by associating first letter of the name with last name. I’m pretty sure X. Wang is at least two or three different people and some names (especially those with an umlaut or, for some reason, Paul Schrater) are especially likely to change spelling from year to year. I tried correcting a bit, but fair warning.

Power law 2004-2015

 

As I mentioned last year, the distribution of posters follows a power law.

But now we have the network data and it is pretty awesome to behold. I was surprised that if we just look at this year’s posters, there is tons of structure (click here for a high-res, low-size PDF version):
ajcCOSYNE_2015_small_image

When you include both 2014 and 2015, things get even more connected (again, PDF version):

ajcCOSYNE_2014-2015_small_image

Beyond this it starts becoming a mess. The community is way too interconnected and lines fly about every which way. If anyone has an idea of a good way to visualize all the data (2004-2015), I am all ears. And as I said, I have the full connectivity diagram so if anyone wants to play around with the data, just shoot me an email at adam.calhoun at gmail.

Any suggestions for further analyses?

 

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7 thoughts on “#Cosyne2015, by the numbers

  1. An interesting thing to work out from your data is to look for those who co-author with different groups (across all years)

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