Behold, the behaving brain!

In my opinion, THE most important shift in neuroscience over the past few years has been the focus on how behavior changes neural function across the whole brain. Even the sensory systems – supposedly passive passers-on of perfectly produced pictures of the world – will be shifted in unique ways by behavior. An animal walking will have different responses to visual stimuli than an animal that is just sitting around. Almost certainly, other behaviors will have other effects on the animal.

A pair of papers this week have made that point rather elegantly. First, Carsen Stringer and Marius Pachitariu from the Carandini/Harris labs have gobs of data from when they were recording ~10,000 neurons simultaneously. Marius Pachitariu has an excellent twitter thread explaining the work. I just want to take one particular point from this paper which is that you can explain a surprising amount of variance in the primary visual cortex – and all across the brain – simply by looking at the movement of the animal’s face.

In the figures below, they have taken movies of an animal’s face, extracted the motion energy (roughly, how much movement there is at that location in the video), and then used PCA to find the common ways that you can describe that movement. Using this kind of common motion, they then tried to predict the activity of individual neurons – while ignoring the traditional sensory or task information that you would normally be looking at.

The other paper is from Simon Musall and Matt Kaufman in Anne Churchland’s lab. He also has a nice twitter description of their work. Here, they used a technique that is able to image the whole brain simultaneously (though I am not sure to what depth), though at the cost of resolution (individual neurons are not identifiable but are averaged together). The animals are doing a task where they need to tell the difference between two tones, or two flashes of light. You can look for the brain areas involved in choice, or the areas involved in responding to vision or audio, and they are there (choice, kind of?).  But if you look at where movement is being represented it is everywhere.

The things that you would normally look for – the amount of brain activity you can explain by an animal’s decisions or its sensory responses – explain very little unique information.
This latter point is really important. If you had looked at the data and ignored the movement, you would have certainly found neurons that were correlated with decision-making. But once you take into account movement, that correlation drops away – the decisions are too correlated with general movement variables. People need to start thinking about how much of their neural data is responding to the task the animal is doing and how much is due to movement variables that are aligned to the task. This is really important! Simple averaging will not wash away this movement.

There is a lot more to both of these papers and both will be more than worth your time to dig into.

I’m not sure if you would have noticed this effect in either case if they weren’t recording from massive numbers of neurons simultaneously. This is a brave new world of neuroscience. How do we deal with this massively complex behavioral data at the same time that we deal with massive neural populations?

In my mind, the gold standard for how to analyze this data comes from Eva Naumann and James Fitzgerald in a paper out of the Engert lab. They are analyzing data from the whole brain of the zebrafish as it fictively swims around and responds to some moving background. Rather than throwing up their hands at the complexity of this data and the number of moving pieces what they did was very precisely quantify one particular aspect of the behavior. Then they followed the circuit step by step and tried to understand how the quantified behavior was transformed in the circuit. How did the visual stimuli guide the fish’s orientation in the water? What were the different ways the retina represented that visual information? How was this transformed by the relays into the brain? How was this information further transformed in the next step? How did the motor centers generate the different types of behavior that were quantified?

The brain evolved to produce behavior. In my opinion there is no way to understand the brain – any of it – if you don’t understand the behavior that the animal is producing.

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